Video Tips Plans Tips from Woodsmith Kreg Community
Getting the Most from a Materials List and Cutting Diagram
The first step of any successful project is acquiring all of the lumber and other building supplies. Many woodworking websites, DIY blogs and magazines help you with this. For example, at buildsomething.com you’ll find a cutting diagram and materials list with every Certified project. In this edition of Kreg Plus, we’ll share tips to help you get the most from these great resources.

A List of Parts

Start by taking a look at the materials list, such as the one shown here from our friends at Woodsmith magazine. The quantity of each part is listed with its name. The overall dimensions come next: thickness, width, and then length. You can see how these relate to a project workpiece in the Dimensions drawing below. A List of Parts

Dimensions

Starting with thickness, this dimension usually indicates the final, or finished, thickness of the workpiece, not the rough (nominal) thickness of the lumber. We explain the difference here. For sheet goods, the thickness may be followed by an abbreviation such as “ply” (plywood), “hdbd” (hardboard), or “MDF” (medium-density fiberboard).
Final Dimensions
The final width of the part is the second dimension shown. For solid-wood parts, this dimension is measured across the grain. This is the dimension you’ll use if you need to rip the workpiece to width. The last dimension shown is the overall length of the part. This length should include any joinery, such as tenons, that needs to be cut on the ends of the workpiece before assembly.

Cutting Diagram

A cutting diagram provides a visual guide to the parts list. For plans that use softwood or dimensional lumber, nominal board dimensions for each board will be shown. For hardwood lumber, which is often sold in random widths and lengths, the important number to look at is the board feet. It’s the minimum amount of rough lumber you’ll need to build the project.

For boards thicker than 1/2", the total number of board feet indiciated should allow you to cut out all of the parts labeled on that board. Boards 1/2" thick or less are often sold by the square foot. If multiple boards are required, the quantity of boards should also be shown.

Nestled between the board dimension and the overall board footage, you may see the species of wood used in the project. Secondary woods like poplar or maple are often used for drawer sides and backs.

On the list shown here, there’s also a list of sheet goods and other items you need.
Cutting Diagram

A List of Hardware

In addition to a list of parts needed to assemble the project, a good project plan should include a list of hardware and other materials required. For instance, the fasteners you need are shown in the list of supplies. The type of screw may be abbreviated: Fh (flathead), Rh (roundhead), and Ph (panhead).

A List of Hardware

It’s a good idea to keep a supply of #8 x 1 1/4" and #8 x 1 1/2" flathead woodscrews on hand. These are common sizes you’ll use on most projects. If you build a lot projects with pocket holes, also keep a supply of 1 1/4" pocket-hole screws. They’re the size for commonly-used 3/4"-thick material.

Create Your Own Cutting Diagram

What do you do, though, if the plans didn’t come with a materials list or cutting diagram? Or what if you’re designing your own project? In those cases, you’ll need to create your own. It’s easier than you might think. We show you how here.

For sheet goods, use graph paper or a drawing program on your computer to make a cutting diagram. A computer drawing program like SketchUp makes it easier to lay out and rearrange parts. You can download a free version to try out here.
Create Your Own Cutting Diagram

Perfect-Looking Projects

By taking the time to familiarize yourself with the project parts, hardware, and instructions on how the project goes together, you can save a lot of hassle later. In the end, the project will go together more smoothly and become something you can really be proud of.

And, if you end up creating plans for your original projects, be sure to share them here to inspire others and show off your work!
Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine

You Might also like

Tall Chest of Drawers

Tall Chest of Drawers

Bookcase with Toy Storage

Bookcase with Toy Storage

Platform Bed

Platform Bed

Three-Drawer Dresser

Three-Drawer Dresser

Rolling Kitchen Cart

Rolling Kitchen Cart

Coffee Play Table

Coffee Play Table

From Kreg and Woodsmith Magazine
...............................................
©2016 Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc.

Like this email? Sign up for more!

Instagram Pinterest Facebook You Tube Twitter Google Plus Kreg Owners Community


©2016 Kreg Tool Company. All rights reserved.

201 Campus Drive | Huxley, Iowa 50124 | www.kregtool.com

You are receiving this email because you opted to receive email updates from Kreg Tool Company.
Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.

If you prefer not to receive emails such as this, you may unsubscribe.

Kreg Tool Company takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, read our Privacy Policy.