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Part 2 of 3
Take a Site Survey
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Building Better Built-Ins Part 2 of 3
Built-in cabinets can transform a room. In fact, they often become the focal point of the entire space. So to look their best, built-ins have to fit into the space perfectly — like a hand in a glove… but getting that perfect fit can be frustrating. After all, no matter how carefully you build the project, it will likely have to fit into a less-than-perfect room. That’s because floors and ceilings aren’t always level, walls may not be plumb, and corners aren’t exactly square.

Actually, building a built-in that fits isn’t as tough as you’d think. With the Kreg Jig® and a bit of know-how on how built-in cabinets are designed, you’ll be able to add a bit of custom elegance to every room in the house.

Right Angle Clamp Video Right Angle Clamp

When constructing built-ins, one of the handiest tools you can own is a Kreg Right Angle Clamp. It’s simply unbeatable for creating 90 degree panel joints. Watch the video and see the difference it could make for your next project!

Part 2 of 3: Take a Site Survey
(Three Part Series: look for part 3 in a future issue.)
Before you can build your cabinet, you’ll have to figure out what size to make it. This is done with a site survey. Measurements are an important part of a site survey, of course, but the process also reveals the “problem” areas in a room.

As you work through the site survey, you’ll want to record all the results so you can use them later to help size the cabinet. For the most accurate survey, draw a simple room diagram.

Measure First – Start by measuring the area where the built-in will be located. To do this right, you’ll need to check the distances from wall to wall and floor to ceiling in several places.

Check Level & Plumb – Next, use a long level (4’ or longer is ideal), and check to see if the walls are plumb and the floor and ceiling are level. This will show whether the gaps between the cabinet and walls will be consistent from top to bottom, or tapered.

See if It’s Square – Next, check the corners of the room with a framing square. This shows whether the cabinet can be tucked into a corner, or whether it will need to be pushed out a bit to fit.

Look for the Bows – The last step in the site survey is checking the flatness of the walls. Even if they appear flat, they may bow in or out or be rippled. Knowing this will give an indication of how easy or complicated y our scribing cuts later will be.
1) Measure Space
2) Plumb & Level
3) Check For Bows

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Narrow Cottage
End Tables
Kreg Router Cabinet
Video Project Plan
Hide-a-Way
Ironing Board

Multi-Purpose Push Stick Precision Setup Bars Teardrop Camper Trailer


From Kreg and Woodsmith Magazine
...............................................
2011 August Home Publishing

Kreg Tool Company
201 Campus Drive | Huxley, Iowa 50124
www.kregtool.com

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Part 2 of 3
Take a Site Survey
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|*
View this e-mail in a browser window
*|END:IF|*
Email Settings
Kreg Plus
Video Tips Plans Tips from Woodsmith Kreg Community
Building Better Built-Ins Part 2 of 3
Built-in cabinets can transform a room. In fact, they often become the focal point of the entire space. So to look their best, built-ins have to fit into the space perfectly — like a hand in a glove… but getting that perfect fit can be frustrating. After all, no matter how carefully you build the project, it will likely have to fit into a less-than-perfect room. That’s because floors and ceilings aren’t always level, walls may not be plumb, and corners aren’t exactly square.

Actually, building a built-in that fits isn’t as tough as you’d think. With the Kreg Jig® and a bit of know-how on how built-in cabinets are designed, you’ll be able to add a bit of custom elegance to every room in the house.
Watch the Right Angle Clamp Video

Part 2 of 3: Take a Site Survey
(Three Part Series: look for part 3 in a future issue.)
Before you can build your cabinet, you’ll have to figure out what size to make it. This is done with a site survey. Measurements are an important part of a site survey, of course, but the process also reveals the “problem” areas in a room.

As you work through the site survey, you’ll want to record all the results so you can use them later to help size the cabinet. For the most accurate survey, draw a simple room diagram.

Measure First – Start by measuring the area where the built-in will be located. To do this right, you’ll need to check the distances from wall to wall and floor to ceiling in several places.

Check Level & Plumb – Next, use a long level (4’ or longer is ideal), and check to see if the walls are plumb and the floor and ceiling are level. This will show whether the gaps between the cabinet and walls will be consistent from top to bottom, or tapered.

See if It’s Square – Next, check the corners of the room with a framing square. This shows whether the cabinet can be tucked into a corner, or whether it will need to be pushed out a bit to fit.

Look for the Bows – The last step in the site survey is checking the flatness of the walls. Even if they appear flat, they may bow in or out or be rippled. Knowing this will give an indication of how easy or complicated y our scribing cuts later will be.
1) Measure Space
2) Plumb & Level
3) Check For Bows

*|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|*   *|FACEBOOK:LIKE|*

Narrow Cottage
End Tables
Kreg Router Cabinet
Video Project Plan
Hide-a-Way
Ironing Board

Multi-Purpose Push Stick Precision Setup Bars Teardrop Camper Trailer


From Kreg and Woodsmith Magazine
...............................................
2011 August Home Publishing

Kreg Tool Company
201 Campus Drive | Huxley, Iowa 50124
www.kregtool.com

twitterfacebookYou TubeKreg Jig Owners

 
Unsubscribe Email Settings Archive

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