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Part 3 of 3
Scribe For Success
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Building Better Built-Ins Getting a perfect fit in a less-than-perfect space. Part 3 of 3
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Building a cabinet to account for irregularities in the walls is a good start to a great-looking built-in project. Now, to get a professional-looking installation you’ll need to scribe the cabinet and cut it to fit those irregularities. Scribing is the relatively simple process of marking the contour of the wall onto the part of the cabinet that will fit against it. This is accomplished by butting the cabinet against the wall, and then running a pencil along the wall to scribe a line on the edge of the part. This part is then cut to the scribe line to fit against the wall.

Kreg Jig Jr. - Watch the Video!

Part 3 of 3 (Three Part Series)

Step 1: Level the Playing Field
Before you can scribe or cut, it’s critical that the cabinet is resting level and plum. The easiest way to do this instead of trying to level of large heavy back-breaking built-in is to use a base unit. The base unit can be leveled using shims then can be used as a simple toe-kick or low cabinet when done.

First, set the base on the floor and check to see if it sits level. Then, insert shims and check it for level again. Make adjustments until the base is resting level. Once it is, secure the base unit to the wall and trim the exposed portion of the shims.

Start Off Level

Do A Quick Double-Check

With the base installed and leveled, you can set your cabinet in place above it. Before you begin to scribe lines onto the cabinet, it’s a good idea to do a quick double-check for level and plumb on the cabinet itself.

Step 2: Scribe for Success
You’re now ready to scribe the lines on the cabinet. As simple as scribing is, there are a few tips that will make it easier and more accurate. One tip is to scribe using a compass. The nice thing about a compass is that it’s easily adjustable, so you can set it to the widest gap between the cabinet and the wall. Then, place one side of the compass against the wall, and the other part to be scribed. Now run the compass along the wall, making sure to hold the compass at the same angle throughout the marking process.

If the cabinet has a visible side, chances are good that you’ll have to scribe and cut both the face-frame and the side of the cabinet. To keep things simple, a good approach is to scribe and cut one area at a time. Start with either the most visible area or the one with the largest gaps, then move on to the next area.


Step 3: Sneak Up on the Cut Line
Once you scribe your lines, it’s time to trim off the excess material up to the marks. It’s best to use a two step process here – first, use your jig saw for following the curves and contours of the scribe line accurately, but don’t cut the edge perfectly square. Instead, tilt the base of the saw to 10 degrees and then “back bevel” the edge. This extra step ensures a tight fit against the wall, and makes it easier to remove any additional material from the edge. Use tape to protect the surface of your cut, and do not cut the line itself. Cut slightly outside the line first, then you can easily “sneak-up” on the line using a sanding block or a block plane to get a perfect fit. Once you have reached the scribe line, check the fit aginst the wall. If you still see any gaps, use the sander or plane to fine-tune the edge. Continue checking and tweaking this edge until the fit is just right.


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From Kreg and Woodsmith Magazine
...............................................
2011 August Home Publishing

Kreg Tool Company
201 Campus Drive | Huxley, Iowa 50124
www.kregtool.com

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Part 3 of 3
Scribe For Success
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|*
View this e-mail in a browser window
*|END:IF|*
Email Settings
Kreg Plus
Video Tips Plans Tips from Woodsmith Kreg Community
Building Better Built-Ins Getting a perfect fit in a less-than-perfect space. Part 3 of 3
See Part 1
See Part 2
Building a cabinet to account for irregularities in the walls is a good start to a great-looking built-in project. Now, to get a professional-looking installation you’ll need to scribe the cabinet and cut it to fit those irregularities. Scribing is the relatively simple process of marking the contour of the wall onto the part of the cabinet that will fit against it. This is accomplished by butting the cabinet against the wall, and then running a pencil along the wall to scribe a line on the edge of the part. This part is then cut to the scribe line to fit against the wall.

Watch The Video Kreg Jig® Jr.

When installing your built-ins you may need to add a few last-minute pocket-holes in tight places. The compact Kreg Jig® Jr. is the perfect tool for the job, and a great addition to any Kreg collection.

Part 3 of 3 (Three Part Series)

Step 1: Level the Playing Field
Before you can scribe or cut, it’s critical that the cabinet is resting level and plum. The easiest way to do this instead of trying to level of large heavy back-breaking built-in is to use a base unit. The base unit can be leveled using shims then can be used as a simple toe-kick or low cabinet when done.

First, set the base on the floor and check to see if it sits level. Then, insert shims and check it for level again. Make adjustments until the base is resting level. Once it is, secure the base unit to the wall and trim the exposed portion of the shims.

Start Off Level

Do A Quick Double-Check

With the base installed and leveled, you can set your cabinet in place above it. Before you begin to scribe lines onto the cabinet, it’s a good idea to do a quick double-check for level and plumb on the cabinet itself.

Step 2: Scribe for Success
You’re now ready to scribe the lines on the cabinet. As simple as scribing is, there are a few tips that will make it easier and more accurate. One tip is to scribe using a compass. The nice thing about a compass is that it’s easily adjustable, so you can set it to the widest gap between the cabinet and the wall. Then, place one side of the compass against the wall, and the other part to be scribed. Now run the compass along the wall, making sure to hold the compass at the same angle throughout the marking process.

If the cabinet has a visible side, chances are good that you’ll have to scribe and cut both the face-frame and the side of the cabinet. To keep things simple, a good approach is to scribe and cut one area at a time. Start with either the most visible area or the one with the largest gaps, then move on to the next area.


Step 3: Sneak Up on the Cut Line
Once you scribe your lines, it’s time to trim off the excess material up to the marks. It’s best to use a two step process here – first, use your jig saw for following the curves and contours of the scribe line accurately, but don’t cut the edge perfectly square. Instead, tilt the base of the saw to 10 degrees and then “back bevel” the edge. This extra step ensures a tight fit against the wall, and makes it easier to remove any additional material from the edge. Use tape to protect the surface of your cut, and do not cut the line itself. Cut slightly outside the line first, then you can easily “sneak-up” on the line using a sanding block or a block plane to get a perfect fit. Once you have reached the scribe line, check the fit aginst the wall. If you still see any gaps, use the sander or plane to fine-tune the edge. Continue checking and tweaking this edge until the fit is just right.


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You Might Also Like ...
Entertainment Cart
Project Plan
Danny Lipford discusses
the Square-Cut™
Outdoor Pitch Chair
Project Plan

Danny Lipford discusses
the Crown-Pro™
Grill Trolley Front Room Built-In


From Kreg and Woodsmith Magazine
...............................................
2011 August Home Publishing

Kreg Tool Company
201 Campus Drive | Huxley, Iowa 50124
www.kregtool.com

twitterfacebookYou TubeKreg Jig Owners

 
Unsubscribe Email Settings Archive

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